BBQ Connection LLC

Championship BBQ Catering at it's BEST!

Charlottesville, VA.

Only ChampionshipBBQ Catering Company!!!!!!
We are a Championship BBQ Catering Company (period!). BBQ Connection LLC  the BestChampionship onsite BBQ Catering Company in the area. Our Pit Master has spent the last 10 Ten years competing for throughout the country and perfecting his art.  The Pigs on the Run BBQCompetition team have won over a 100 top ten trophies in the country and recently finished in the Top 50 in the country in BBQ! We live and breathe BBQ!

Our pit masters do not just cook the area's best BBQ; they create a BBQ experience! From the smells in the air to the many trophies won.  The BBQ ConnectionCatering Company brings more to the table than just great food.  We cook fresh on site Traditional Barbecue, not that "stuff" that has been reheated or prepared off site days before your event.

Over 100 years of traditional artisan outdoor cooking, passed down from generation to generation in the backwoods of Va.

We also cater in Northern Virginia, Richmond, Staunton, Harrisonburg, Waynesboro VA. and all over the country! A travel fee will be assessed outside Charlottesville area.

 A proven winner: 4 x Grand Championships, 5 x state championships, Invited to the American Royal and the Jack Daniels twice. Over 100 top ten awards

We'll respond with a free, no-obligation job estimate and ideas that come from years (and thousands of miles) of experience!
 If you desire a truly memorable meal to which nothing else will compare, please give   Teresa call at 434 842 2000.

Charlotteville's BEST Championship BBQ!

Chuckie for lunch

I am blessed to have Rick Hollian as a friend ! He will cook just about anything on a smoker. Here is latest adventure with Chuckie the chuck roast. Here is  our conversation.
3 1/2 # chuck roast.


Rick
i just don't see the fascination with chuck roasts. to me they are greasier and stickier than a pork butt.
OK

John
How did it taste?

Rick
I'd rather save up for a strip or fillet like you make and enjoy it

John
Give me a quick write up the chuck . good or bad.

Rick
The seasoning was all Dr bbq big time bbq rub. I didnt inject (no beef broth in the house, but it did jaccard the crap out of it
was still a fun day with the wsm.

John
great.

Rick
The chuckie may have been better with an injection but it was only 2.89 lbs. most of it would have run out. I did smear some worchester sauce on it after the rub and let it sit for 30 mins
it tastes good, just sticky. I guess im hooked on pork

He cooked for 6 1/2 hours .at 275 degrees. He  wrapped in foil for 45 minutes. internal temp at  175 to 196 and unwrapped.
He cooked it on the WSM.




Comfort Zone Camp Richmond

Hey friends and family.  As you guys know, I suffer from a BBQ problem.  Mostly, I can't get enough, be it fixing it, eating it, or sharing the experience with others.  Yesterday, my partner Mark Agee and I were blessed to help out at Comfort Zone Camp in Goochland Va doing a full dinner for the over 200 campers and guidance personnel.  Our friend and mentor,  John Atkins, along with Eric Blum have been involved with cooking for this wonderful organization for 3 years now. This was the first year Mark and I have helped, and what a great feeling and humbling experience it was. This is a camp of kids that have lost a parent, a sibling or a caretaker. Please check out there web link at the end of this email. What a great organization, first class, and the kids are fantastic! We prepared a whole pig (named Pete the Pig), potato salad, homemade slaw, homemade meatless lasagna, pulled pork, brisket and hot-dogs.  We were treated like heroes, but in the end its the counselors, and support staff along with the kids that are the heroes. I can't wait for the next opportunity to help out with this organization.


By Rick Holian








2011 Sam's Club BBQ Series & National Championship


Sam's Club

KCBS

2011 Sam's Club BBQ Series & National Championship

KCBS and Sam's Club are excited to announce the Sam's Club BBQ Series! With over $400,000 in prize money and major bragging rights, this is one series you won't want to miss!
The 2011 Sam's Club BBQ Series will feature 20 local events, five Regional events and one National Championship in Bentonville, Ark.
The first registration period for the Sam's Club BBQ Series has officially closed.
From all of us at KCBS and Sam's Club, good luck to all teams!!

We signed up for the Sam's club contest in Chesapeake. 9/16/11 - 9/17/11 Sam's Club 4710 2444 Chesapeake SQ Ring Rd. Chesapeake VA
2011 Sam's Club BBQ Series & National Championship
2011 Sam's Club BBQ Series & National Championship
Region 5 Local Event: Chesapeake, VA
Date: September 16 - September 17, 2011
Location: 2444 Chesapeake SQ Ring Rd., Chesapeake, VA

Confirmed Teams:
Lazy Ass BBQ Crew
R2-BQ
Porkers in Paradise
Degüello BBQ
Old Dominion Smokehouse
Hambones by the Fire
Black Cat BBQ
JD's Smokin' Misfits
Pigheaded BBQ
Smok'n Fire BBQ
Grog N Hogs
Jacked Up BBQ
Mr.Bobo's Traveling BBQ Allstars
who are those guys?
WOOD CHICKS BBQ
Checkered Pig
Nomad BBQ
Lyin Pigs
Two State BBQ
pigs on the run
widespread barbecue
Whiskey Hill BBQ
Big and Twig BBQ
Diamond State Smokers
Swing Dings BBQ
Awaiting Confirmation:
Donnies Smokehouse

George Robert Pulley farewell our good friend!

 I met George Robert Pulley of 3 P's BBQ team in our first BBQ contest in Richmond Va. Sept. 2002
It was our first contest and we were very overwhelmed. I was surprised to see a team from near to my home town of Zuni Va. I found out he went to school with my father and uncles. I thought we were almost family. It was very encouraging to meet him and his wife. They came in second over all in  that contest. Since then our past have crossed many times. He and his wife have always been the example of a great and humble competitor!
We had the great pleasure to compete in our home town and guess who was there: our good friends 3 P's cooking team. We were short one shoulder because of a mix up and guess who can to the rescue? George gave us one of his shoulder and loaned us a chair so we could get into the rib finals!
Thanks!



George Pulley Sr.

  

George R. Pulley Sr. WINDSOR - George Robert Pulley Sr., 67, beloved son, husband, father, grandfather and friend, passed away Saturday, Dec. 11, 2010. He was the son of the late Marvin M. Sr. and Emma Lee Hall Pulley and was a lifelong resident of Isle of Wight County. George Robert lived a full life. He lived on the family farm and maintained the farm most of his life. He was employed with Gwaltney Foods for some 13 years before enjoying his happy retirement. Later in life he was passionate about cooking and catering parties, and social gatherings with 3 P's Cooking Team. He traveled nationally and won 45 cook-off trophies. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, trapping game and gardening. He was a member of the Isle of Wight Hunt Club and Isle of Wight Ruritan Club. He served on the Isle of Wight Fair Committee and the 4-H Committee and was a Little League coach. He was an avid Washington Redskins fan and was a member of Central Hill Baptist Church and the church choir and was a deacon. In addition to his parents, George Robert is preceded in death by his son, George Robert Pulley Jr. He leaves to cherish his memories, his wife of 44 years, Linda Sexton Pulley; his son, Henry L. Pulley and his wife Jinny of Windsor; three grandchildren, Madison, Kendall and H. Leighton Pulley II; and a host of friends and extended family. A funeral will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 15, in Colonial Funeral Home with the Rev. Roger Johnson officiating. Burial will follow in Central Hill Baptist Church Cemetery. The family and friends will gather 5:30 to 8 p.m. today in the funeral home for visitation and at other times in the home of his son, Henry (Jinny) Pulley, 17418 Pope Swamp Trail, Windsor. The family suggests memorial contributions to Central Hill Baptist Church Cemetery Fund, 10270 Central Hill Road, Windsor, VA 23487.



Georges last BBQ contest.

WINDSOR—Four-year-old Henry Pulley II stayed up until 1:30 a.m. Saturday. His father, Henry, pulled an all-nighter.
George Pulley of Windsor pulls apart barbecued baby back ribs for judging during the Hamtown Pork and Fork Fest at Isle of Wight Fairgrounds on Saturday. Pulley has won 45 national awards for his barbecue. -- Gwen Albers | Tidewater News
The elder Pulley was competing in the Hamtown Pork and Fork Fest at Isle of Wight Fairgrounds, where other professional competitors stayed up all night cooking for the next day’s judging. His son got to spend the night.
“We pitched a tent,” Henry Pulley said.
Henry Pulley and his parents, George and Linda Sue Pulley, as a part of the 3Ps Cooking Team of Windsor, competed against 15 of the nation’s top barbecue cooks sanctioned by the Memphis BBQ Network.
Competitors start with a whole pig, which is cooked throughout the night. The Pulleys use a combination of oak and hickory to cook their pig.
“You have to make sure the temperature stays at 200 to 220 and that (the fire) is vented,” Henry Pulley said.
George Pulley began competing in 1993 and has won 45 national titles while traveling throughout the country. His wife appreciated having a competition in their own backyard.
“I think it’s wonderful that we don’t have to travel to Memphis or Florida,” Linda Sue Pulley said.
The Pulleys did not make the finals.
Connie Caruso and her husband, Rich Militano, traveled from Yardville, N.J. For the money they spent to compete, Caruso joked they could’ve spent a week in Bermuda.
Preparing for a competition involves preparing the sauces and rubs, equipping the trailer for hauling the cooker and preparing the meat. It’s all worth it, Caruso said.
“We both like to cook and it’s something we can do together,” she said.
To make it even better, they took third place in the pork shoulder division
Terry Rhinier, special events coordinator for Smithfield and Isle of Wight Tourism Bureau, was pleased with the two-day event sponsored by her agency and Smithfield Foods.
“The contestants were happy, and we had some great bands there,” Rhinier said.
For a donation to the ASPCA, visitors could try the barbecue and choose their favorite.
“For the People’s Choice contest, people had mounds of food on their plates,” Rhinier said.
Country Boys from Suffolk won the award. The team plans to open a restaurant in Smithfield.

Hamtown Pork & Fork-2010 Smithfield, Va.

 Congrats To Whiskey Hill BBQ - 1st Place in "Anything Butt Contest Drink" - Hamtown Pork & Fork-2010 Smithfield, Va.

2010 Winners

                                   Anything Butt Contest -   Drink                                    
1st place - Whiskey Hill BBQ
2nd place - Checkered Pig
3rd place -  3 P's

Anything Butt Contest - Entree1st place - Checkered Pig
2nd place - Steffy BBQ
3rd place - Hog Wild Hokies

People's Choice winner was Country Boys BBQ
Pro Team winner as follows:
Whole Hog
1st place - Yazoo's Delta Q
2nd place - Ranucci's Big Butt BBQ
3rd place - JD's Smokin Misfits
4th place - Three Eyz BBQ

Shoulder1st place - Yazoo's Delta Q
2nd place - Ranucci's Big Butt BBQ
3rd place - Pig Pen BBQ
4th place - Checkered Pig

Rib1st place - Checkered Pig
2nd place - Ranucci's Big Butt BBQ
3rd place - Three Eyz BBQ
4th place - Yazoo's Delta Q

Grand Champion - Checkered Pig

November 5 and 6, 2010

BBQ Snobs review of Two J's Smokehouse

 Great BBQ place!  The basic idea of true BBQ is smoke. One must know how to manage a fire to accomplish this feat. Too much smoke and  the food becomes acrid and bitter , not enough smoke and you might as will cook in a "crock pot"! I advise when one is visiting a BBQ place: Look , Listen and Smell. Look for wood and something called blue smoke ( very clear in appearance with a blue tinge ) coming out of the smoker. Listen for quietness( customers are too busy to talk) . Last , smell: it should be a very pleasant and memorable aroma, bringing back very pleasant memories of ones past!
Two J's has all three. They do cheat : they use a pellet cooker. Oh well nobody is perfect!

Tri Tip BBQ Beef



Here is what he came up with.Cooked my first Tri-tip Sunday on the Weber Kettle. It was almost 2 lbs, and I set it up for reverse sear. It was seasoned with Salt, cracked pepper, garlic powder and some crushed parsley flakes.  My bride doesn't like anything smoky flavored, so I didn't use anything like Bovine bold but I wish I had! She didn't like it anyway, and I know it would have been better!   Here is a couple pics.  It was good, just not as good as I had anticipated.  I just sliced off a cold piece from the leftover, and it seems to gotten a better taste on the second day.  Kind of like smoked chicken does, as it hides in the dark fridge overnite!












"Slices of beef tri tip are marinated and grilled. This is a great easy summer barbeque idea!"
Ingredients:
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons water
2 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
ground black pepper to taste
4 pounds beef tri tip, cut into 1/2 inch
slices
Directions:
1. In a large, non-reactive bowl, blend the soy sauce, olive oil, water, garlic, and pepper. Place the beef tri tip in the marinade. Cover, and marinate in the refrigerator at least 4 hours.
2. Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat, and lightly oil grate.
3. Grill the beef slices 3 to 5 minutes per side, or to desired doneness. Discard remaining marinade.

Prince George family BBQ


Prince George family BBQ
4605 county Drive Dispuntana Virginia ( Hwy 460)
I am always looking for a" good" BBQ Joint in Virginia. which surprisingly is a hard find. I just happen to luck out when we stopped at Prince George family BBQ at hwy 460 and interstate 295 outside of Petersburg Va. We enter the place around 6ish and the joint was empty except for a truck driver in the corner. The place was very clean and pleasant atmosphere.
The menu was very traditional and easy to read. i noticed that they had a BBQ sample plate for $14.95 ( BBQ ribs , 1/2 chicken, chopped pork and brisket. i was very surprised because most joints did not offer such a wide selection. My son got a pork chop plat (three large pork chops smothered with gravy and onions yum)
Ok to the barbecue! My wife had the brisket and she was a little disappointed due to it was chopped not sliced. She claimed. Nice hickory smoked taste. Nowhere near competition quality, It was dry but was revived with a little sauce.
My ribs had a commercial rub and i claimed a hint of cinnamon, The owner and cook denied it, It was a very generic rub, probably southern prides standard rub. I thought the rib were moist even after being reheated Almost fall off the bone.
My brisket was chopped and dry to but edible. I would have preferred sliced but understood why it was better to serve chopped. i thought the rub and smoke was prevalent
The pork was very very disappointing. It was over sauced. It was an eastern NC. bbq sauce. I felt like all the rubbing and smoking was wasted. I could not discern anything other than vinegar.

The star of the show was the chicken. I was very impressed with a half of chicken. It had flavor all the way through. The breast was a little dry but with a little sauce it well worth the slight distraction.

Sides; BBQ beans needed a kick, slaw great, onion rings good and hot, greens wife's favorite. Mashed potato was a smashed!
Over all I thought the experience was a nice pleasant surprise for Virginia BBQ The portions were great and the food was good with a true smokey flavor

The Judges score Appearance 7 , Tenderness 7 , Taste 7
I thought this was good BBQ for Va.
Good job guys!

Town raises money for boy

By Alice Mannette/staff
amannette@newsleader.com

WAYNESBORO — One 11-year-old boy has brought more than 400 people together — some are kin, some are friends and some are strangers.

Justin Harris was diagnosed with cancer last year. He divides his time among St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, his home in Crimora and Hugh K. Cassell Elementary School.

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Justin loves to talk, play video games and barbecue — he's even a junior barbecue champ.

John Atkins, a family friend who considers himself family, organized Saturday's barbecue fundraiser to help the family. He managed to get all the food donated, so all the proceeds go to the family, who will use the money to offset their increased expenses. Atkins owns the Barbecue Connection in Palmyra and has national trophies in barbecuing.

"This little town has a focus of such great magnitude it's unbelievable," said Atkins, his voice cracking from sadness. "We want to tell everybody thank you."

Like Atkins, many of the barbecuers came from away, some traveled from Pennsylvania, others from North Carolina and Richmond. Most woke up at 3 or 4 a.m. to get here in time, Atkins said.

Although the research hospital pays for Justin's treatment, his family must travel every few weeks to Memphis.

"He can't go by plane, because of the large doses of chemotherapy," said his father, Mark Harris.

Since treatment started, the family had to buy a car, a "more reliable" one," Harris said.

Mark Harris continues to work as an emergency medical technician, but takes more days off than he used to. Even with the hospital's help, the family's expenses have overwhelmed their budget.

Justin's mother, Chris, had to stop baby-sitting, and her other children, Stacey, 8, and Anna, who turns 6 today, have to stay with their grandparents more often.

This is the third fundraiser for the family. Both the school and the Crimora Players had fundraisers last year.

"It's just overwhelming," said Joe Harris, Justin's grandfather. "Most everything has been donated."

An hour into the event more than 250 meals were sold, not including the ones that were called in — like the 26 meals for Invista employees. Atkins planned for 500 meals, but after an hour of serving, he realized that he might run out of food.

"It's overwhelming," Mark Harris said. "Lots of people are coming. I don't know many of them."

"We really don't know the little boy," said Angel Payne who brought her kindergartner. "We just came out to support the cause and enjoy the music."

Elaine Wine, a librarian at A.R. Ware Elementary, brought her family for the same reason, as did Staunton Councilwoman Rita Wilson.

"I thought this was a good cause," Wilson said.

The cafeteria was filled with strangers sitting with strangers enjoying the bluegrass music of "Across the Miles," five of the musicians came in from West Virginia.

"Mark's a friend of mine and he asked me to play," said guitarist Robert Richardson."We can all pray for him, but we can do a little more."

Like Richardson, the Glenns came out to support their friends.

"We came to support the family," said Mary Glenn, who attends church with the Harris family. "He's a strong young man. We look forward to the updates his grandparents give."

The newest update came on Friday.

"He got a report that his tumors right now are stabilized," his father said. "Last time they shrank, this time they're the same."

Justin planned to be at the barbeque event. An honor-roll student, he loves school and friends. But some unexpected tests came up, so he and his mother had to stay behind in Tennessee.

"He (Justin) is unbelievable to face adversity the way he's done," said Atkins, who became friends with Mark Harris at a competition. "I'm not just a barbecue buddy. I hope I'm a member of the family."

Atkins, who also works as a surgical technician at the University of Virginia, said Justin asked him to be there in his scrubs when he had his first surgery.

"He thanked me for being there. It was the hardest thing I ever had to do," said Atkins, whose 10-year-old son, Bryant, is one of Justin's best friends. "I've been there crying with them."

A brief history of North Carolina pulled-pork barbecue.

  A brief history of North Carolina pulled-pork barbecue.





The United States Department of Agriculture says barbecue is any meat "cooked by the direct action of heat resulting from the burning of hardwood or the hot coals therefrom for a sufficient period to assume the usual characteristics" including the formation of a brown crust and a weight loss of at least thirty percent. Hmmm, that means Mother Nature made the first barbecue as the accidental by-product of some ancient forest fire. And, man has been eating the delicious stuff in one form or another to satisfy his carnivorous appetite ever since.
The Early Days

When the Spanish arrived in the Americas, they found the Taino Indians of the West Indies cooking meat and fish over a pit of coals on a framework of green wooden sticks. The Spanish spelling of the Indian name for that framework was "barbacoa". Both the name and method of cooking found their way to North America, where George Washington noted in his diary of 1769 that he "went up to Alexandria to a "barbicue."


Noah Webster's dictionary insists that the one and only correct spelling is barbecue. But, as another US president, Andrew Jackson, noted, "It's a damned poor mind that can think of only one way to spell a word ." He would be mighty pleased to know that over the years folks have been enjoying barbicue, barbique, barbeque, Bar-B-Que, Bar-B-Cue, Bar-B-Q, BBQ, Cue, and just plain Q. (Doesn't it just make you wonder how Dan Quail would spell it?)

The Hogs

The Spanish explorer DeSoto introduced hogs to Florida and Alabama about 1540. The settlers at Jamestown brought swine with them in 1607 and soon thereafter Virginia enacted a law making it illegal to discharge a firearm at a barbecue! The creatures thrived in the wilds of the warm Southern woodlands where cattle perished. By the time of the War Between the States, hogs had been domesticated, and pork had become the principal meat of the South. Not surprisingly, pork has been synonymous with Southern barbecue ever since.
Barbecue

The dictionary will also tell you that the noun "barbecue" has at least four meanings:

a framework to hold meat over a fire for cooking

any meat broiled or roasted on such a framework

an entertainment, usually outdoor, at which such meat is prepared and eaten.

a restaurant that makes a specialty of such meat.



Indeed, barbecues have long been a popular social occasion in the South. But, done in the traditional way, the making of barbecue was hard work. A pit was dug in the ground the day before the gathering and filled with hardwood. The wood was burned down to coals before whole hogs, skewered on poles, were hung over the pit. The pitmasters sat up through the night, turning the hogs on their spits. The following afternoon when the guests arrived, the crisp skin - Mr. Brown - was removed and the cooked meat - the divine Miss White - was pulled in lumps from the carcass before being slathered with a favorite finishing sauce. That's why, to this very day, a social affair centered around pork barbecue is affectionately called a Pig Pickin.
The Joints

Some folks might consider barbecuing a whole hog to be a tad bit of overkill for a fellow with a sudden hankering for a sandwich. But, without benefit of electricity and refrigeration in bygone years, portioned cuts of fresh pork were nonexistent. A solution to this culinary dilemma was provided by a pair of entrepreneurs in Lexington, North Carolina when they hit upon the idea of barbecuing a couple of pigs over open pits in the town square on Saturdays and selling it. Tents soon popped up and the first commercial barbecue joint was born. The boys there in Lexington are still making some mighty fine barbecue in those barbecue joints. At last count, the city had one for every thousand citizens - men, women, and children included!


A good barbecue joint has a modest dining hall. In addition to plain tables, disposable paper place mats, and chairs with wooden seats, it will likely also have a counter with stool seats that swivel. A portrait of an elderly founder on the wall somewhere near the entrance is always a good sign. So are pictures, statues, and other sundry likenesses of pigs. A parking lot packed with a mixture of Harleys, pickup trucks, and Eldoradoes is an even better sign. The pits themselves are generally housed out back in a separate building to avoid burning down the joint in the event of a flameup. The building will have a screen door with a spring on it that twangs when the door slams shut. The hardwood in the yard nearby will be of various ages. You may not see smoke coming from the pit chimneys except when the wood is being burned to coals. But, you should always be able to smell it! Should you find copper lines leading to the pits from a silver tank the size of a small elephant out where the woodyard ought to be, drive on. You ain't there yet! The founder's son has sold his soul to the Devil for the ease of that modern-day bane of barbecue, propane. Come back in a couple of years and you will find a brand new McDonalds there with a drive-up window right where the pits once stood. Good barbecue is a hard way to make a buck.
The Great Debate

There is no debate in North Carolina that barbecue should be pit-cooked and pork. There is, however, is great disagreement about which parts of the pigs should be barbecued and whether tomatoes should be any part of the finishing sauce. Down east, the whole hog, split down the middle, is barbecued . The finishing sauce is a sharp, tomato-free vinegar-and-pepper ketchup. West of U.S. Highway 1, only the shoulders are barbecued, and the milder finishing sauce contains a touch of tomato. Which is better? That most likely depends on which joint you happen to be in at the moment!

North Carolina Barbecue: a Primer


By Terry Mancour




Perhaps North Carolina's finest contribution to international cuisine, the peculiar institution known as Barbecue is one of those Tarheel hotspots that is often misunderstood by folks outside our borders.  Barbecue enjoys a long and distinguished history in North Carolina, and has come to be synonymous with political campaigns, church fund-raisers, and any celebration of merit.  It has been celebrated itself in song, story, poetry, literature and electronic media.  It enjoys as much a prominent place and regional distinctiveness as a 'state dish' as Steamed Crabs do in Maryland, Baked Beans do in Boston, and Salmon does in Seattle.  With the culinary contributions of several different cultures in its background, North Carolina Barbecue has become a subject that can cut across lines of race, class, and the generations.  WUNC, the Public Television station in Chapel Hill, even ran a multi-part television series about it, hosted by Bob Garner, author of an exhaustive book on the subject.  It is, as you will find, every North Carolinian's God-given right to be reckoned an authority on the subject of barbecue.


In an effort to clarify the subject, it is necessary to draw a distinction between the roast meat served in North Carolina and elsewhere.  They are two different animals.  Despite the use of the term in other parts of the country, in North Carolina the word 'barbecue' means roast pork, often the entire pig.  While in Kansas City, Texas, Louisiana, and other havens of the art the emphasis is usually on the sauce, in the Tarheel state the phenomena of barbecue revolves as much around the process of cooking the meat as it does the ingredients of the sauce – although considerable powder is burned, as we shall see, about just what constitutes authentic North Carolina barbecue sauce.


It is impossible to know just how far back the barbecue tradition goes – whether it can be traced to the feasting of animist African slaves, the traditional Scottish/Irish Boar Roast, Native American cooking techniques passed along to the first settlers (The earliest colonists in Jamestown and Tidewater Virginia, similar in geography and culture to Northeastern North Carolina, certainly used the technique, and Jamaican natives were observed using a similar technique as far back as 1661) , or to the pirates and sailors who frequented our shores (Interestingly enough, the term buccaneer, a 17th century adventurer or sea robber, comes from the technique, called "boucan" [meaning barbecue], of curing meat by smoking it slowly over a fire, its French practitioners being called "boucaniers."  It is not unlikely that the technique was transferred from the Caribbean to eastern North Carolina.) will never be known.  It is perhaps a combination of all of them, or a naturally occurring phenomenon, in consideration of the ease with which hogs have been raised in this state.  Today North Carolina produces the second highest number of hogs in the country, providing a wide selection of roasting carcasses.  What is certain is that the practice has almost always included a slow-roasting process, over a low fire of oak or hickory, which lasts most of the day.


The hog roast, or "pig pickin'", is perhaps the heart of North Carolina culinary culture.  The process begins in the wee hours of the morning, when one or two stalwart souls (usually men – for no particularly good reason pig roasting is an art dominated by men) dress the hog carcass and light the fires.  For the last hundred years pigs have been roasted over wood and charcoal fires, but for the last two decades more and more barbecuers have switched to cleaner burning propane flames, which some argue deprive the pork of its traditional smoky flavor.  For either method the roasting is almost always done in a "pig cooker", a fuel oil drum which has been sawed in half, welded to an axel and a trailer hitch, and otherwise altered for the purpose.  These cookers can get quite elaborate, and almost as much breath is wasted on the merits of particular designs as on the proper way to roast and season the hog.   The hog is laid upon the grill over the flame, doused with sauce, the lid is closed, and at that point invariably someone breaks out a bottle.


For the remainder of the day the roasting team stands around the big black steel tank and "watches the pig" – though little actual watching goes on.  Every hour on the hour the lid is raised and the carcass is again liberally doused with sauce, inspected for progress, and then closed up again.  The men spend the time between inspections chatting about the news of the day, the weather, sports, politics, and all other subjects that arise from the confluence of roast pork and hard liquor.


In a traditional pig pickin' the woman are far from idle while the men accomplish the arduous chore of watching the pig and drinking.  The side dishes at a pig pickin' are legendary.  It is an opportunity for everyone to pull out old favorite recipes, some handed down from grandmothers on deathbeds, to delight the palate and impress friends and neighbors.  Various salads, casseroles, pickles, preserves, and a whole host of desserts are prepared for the event.  Some items are mandatory.  Cole slaw, for instance, must be served, although the exact recipe varies from region to region and family to family. Boiled potatoes, with a cup full of barbecue sauce added to the water is also obligatory.  Of course the bread accompaniment is the ubiquitous hushpuppy, the fried cornmeal staple of Southern life since Colonial times.  And gallons and gallons of fresh brewed sweet iced tea, sometimes flavored with lemon, complement the usual celebratory beverages.


A word here about the sauce.  There are two different styles of North Carolina Barbecue, Eastern and Western.  In both cases the sauce is a vinegar-based concoction, heavily seasoned; the largest difference is that the Western, or Lexington style of barbecue adds a small amount of tomato-base to the sauce, and also roasts pork shoulders in preference to the whole hog.  That's it.  That's the difference.  Yet these tiny differences have caused near blood feuds between proponents of the two different styles.  In both cases the vinegar base is augmented by a variety of secret herbs and spices – some favorites are salt, pepper, red pepper, cayenne pepper, onion powder, garlic, nutmeg, molasses, whiskey, and brown sugar.   The specific potion is often a closely held secret, or varies depending on the ingredients at hand, but the sauce is thin, unlike most commercial tomato-based barbecue sauces.  No roaster in their right mind would put that sweet, ketchupy stuff on a perfectly good pig.


The essence of the pig pickin' experience is the pure flavor of slow-roasted, well-seasoned pork.  Often chopped by hand into a fine pulp and seasoned to taste with more sauce, the resulting product is the source of rapturous delight for thousands every day.  The pig pickin' has been used by hundreds of churches as a fund-raising technique, and there was even a Barbecue Presbyterian Church in Harnett County, near Sanford, established in 1757.


While the home-grown pig pickin' has persisted as a venerable institution in North Carolina, the commercial potential of barbecue has been fully realized.  In small towns and big cities across the state there are hundreds of small barbecue establishments who serve either the chopped variety or "pulled" pork sandwiches – a technique by which the tender roasted pork is literally pulled off of the carcass.  Barbecue has become a good-sized business in North Carolina, and many of these establishments augment over-the-counter sales with impressive catering operations.


It has also become traditional for the barbecue catering industry get a huge financial boost every election year.  No one knows whom the first politician was to provide barbecue for supporters at political rallies, but for scores of years now virtually no candidate for office has been able to get away with a successful election without cooking at least one pig for the constituency.  The practice has become so prevalent that even politicians outside of the state will send to North Carolina for expert barbecuers to come and impress their own supporters with the perfectly roasted pink pork.


There are certain towns in North Carolina who have developed a reputation for having the best barbecue joints, making up for a lack of other major attractions.  Goldsboro, Kinston, and Wilson in the East, and Lexington, Greensboro, and a twenty five mile stretch of US 52 between Salisbury and Albemarle (dubbed the Barbecue Trail by barbecue authority Bob Garner in his definitive book) in the West. The establishments in these towns have become local tourist attractions, and those with the barbecue bug think nothing of driving an extra twenty-five miles out of their way to make a pilgrimage to them.


Barbecue is one of the few subjects that has always cut through the usual racial lines North Carolina has been afflicted with.  Even in the depths of the Jim Crow era and in the turbulent Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s barbecue joints were one of the few places where black folks and white folks rubbed elbows on a regular basis.  While black students staged sit-ins at the Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, a few miles away at Stamey's, one of the more famous shops in North Carolina, white folk and black folk sat at the same table, eating the same rich smoky pork sandwiches, with nary a fuss.  Black families and white families have always vied on an equal footing for the bragging rights that come from recipes and roasting techniques.  A roasted pig, it seems, is completely color-blind.


In deference to health concerns and religious customs it is standard for a dozen or so chickens to be roasted with the pig.  Sometimes a separate sauce is used, sometimes the same, but if you follow Mosaic law or fear for your life you will almost always find a pile of succulent barbecued chicken available at either a pig pickin' or barbecue joint.  Vegetarians still despair, though some of the more liberal-minded have tried using the same sauce that is used on pork on a large portabella mushroom.  Needless to say, this scandalizes the barbecue traditionalist.  While the tender fungus does nicely on the grill, it is not recommended that it be subjected to the same six-to-eight hour long roasting that a pig endures.  Put the 'shrooms on the grill about fifteen minutes before serving.


Barbecuing is so competitive in North Carolina that the state boasts no fewer than twenty five annual cook-offs.  Most of these are in the Eastern part of the state, and therefore the whole hog/vinegar sauce method is emphasized, including the North Carolina Championship Pork Cook-Off, sponsored by the North Carolina Pork Producers Association, the Newport Pig Cookin' Contest; adherents to the Western style gather yearly at the Lexington Barbecue Festival to celebrate the pork shoulder/tomato sauce style in Lexington, North Carolina – a town that boasts twenty barbecue restaurants to service 17,000 people (only Lexington, Tennessee, with ten restaurants for 6,000 people has more barbecue restaurants per capita).  The teams which compete at these events range from the weekend roaster to the stainless-steel equipped professional pig cooker.  At stake are cash prizes and bragging rights, and the competition is fierce.  Judges use a very wide variety of criteria to judge a pig, and ensure a lack of corruption by using blind taste tests in addition to on-site tasting inspections.  Barbecue is serious business in North Carolina.


Considerations of length and completeness prohibit a listing of the best places to get barbecue here.  The book North Carolina Barbecue: Flavored by Time, by Bob Garner, is highly recommended for the barbecue novice.  Whether you are a passing traveler or a newcomer to the Tarheel State a trip to a barbecue joint (or, better yet, a church or school pig pickin') is suggested in order to complete the North Carolina culinary experience.  Advice on where to go is easy to come by – just ask any three strangers with North Carolina license plates, and you will have three suggestions – and more likely than not the place will be 'just down the road a'piece'.
The Early Days
When the Spanish arrived in the Americas, they found the Taino Indians of the West Indies cooking meat and fish over a pit of coals on a framework of green wooden sticks. The Spanish spelling of the Indian name for that framework was "barbacoa". Both the name and method of cooking found their way to North America, where George Washington noted in his diary of 1769 that he "went up to Alexandria to a "barbicue."
Noah Webster's dictionary insists that the one and only correct spelling is barbecue. But, as another US president, Andrew Jackson, noted, "It's a damned poor mind that can think of only one way to spell a word ." He would be mighty pleased to know that over the years folks have been enjoying barbicue, barbique, barbeque, Bar-B-Que, Bar-B-Cue, Bar-B-Q, BBQ, Cue, and just plain Q. (Doesn't it just make you wonder how Dan Quail would spell it?)

The Hogs
The Spanish explorer DeSoto introduced hogs to Florida and Alabama about 1540. The settlers at Jamestown brought swine with them in 1607 and soon thereafter Virginia enacted a law making it illegal to discharge a firearm at a barbecue! The creatures thrived in the wilds of the warm Southern woodlands where cattle perished. By the time of the War Between the States, hogs had been domesticated, and pork had become the principal meat of the South. Not surprisingly, pork has been synonymous with Southern barbecue ever since.


Barbecue
The dictionary will also tell you that the noun "barbecue" has at least four meanings:

1. a framework to hold meat over a fire for cooking
2. any meat broiled or roasted on such a framework
3. an entertainment, usually outdoor, at which such meat is prepared and eaten.
4. a restaurant that makes a specialty of such meat.

Indeed, barbecues have long been a popular social occasion in the South. But, done in the traditional way, the making of barbecue was hard work. A pit was dug in the ground the day before the gathering and filled with hardwood. The wood was burned down to coals before whole hogs, skewered on poles, were hung over the pit. The pitmasters sat up through the night, turning the hogs on their spits. The following afternoon when the guests arrived, the crisp skin - Mr. Brown - was removed and the cooked meat - the divine Miss White - was pulled in lumps from the carcass before being slathered with a favorite finishing sauce. That's why, to this very day, a social affair centered around pork barbecue is affectionately called a Pig Pickin.


The Joints
Some folks might consider barbecuing a whole hog to be a tad bit of overkill for a fellow with a sudden hankering for a sandwich. But, without benefit of electricity and refrigeration in bygone years, portioned cuts of fresh pork were nonexistent. A solution to this culinary dilemma was provided by a pair of entrepreneurs in Lexington, North Carolina when they hit upon the idea of barbecuing a couple of pigs over open pits in the town square on Saturdays and selling it. Tents soon popped up and the first commercial barbecue joint was born. The boys there in Lexington are still making some mighty fine barbecue in those barbecue joints. At last count, the city had one for every thousand citizens - men, women, and children included!

A good barbecue joint has a modest dining hall. In addition to plain tables, disposable paper place mats, and chairs with wooden seats, it will likely also have a counter with stool seats that swivel. A portrait of an elderly founder on the wall somewhere near the entrance is always a good sign. So are pictures, statues, and other sundry likenesses of pigs. A parking lot packed with a mixture of Harleys, pickup trucks, and Eldoradoes is an even better sign. The pits themselves are generally housed out back in a separate building to avoid burning down the joint in the event of a flameup. The building will have a screen door with a spring on it that twangs when the door slams shut. The hardwood in the yard nearby will be of various ages. You may not see smoke coming from the pit chimneys except when the wood is being burned to coals. But, you should always be able to smell it! Should you find copper lines leading to the pits from a silver tank the size of a small elephant out where the woodyard ought to be, drive on. You ain't there yet! The founder's son has sold his soul to the Devil for the ease of that modern-day bane of barbecue, propane. Come back in a couple of years and you will find a brand new McDonalds there with a drive-up window right where the pits once stood. Good barbecue is a hard way to make a buck.


The Great Debate
There is no debate in North Carolina that barbecue should be pit-cooked and pork. There is, however, is great disagreement about which parts of the pigs should be barbecued and whether tomatoes should be any part of the finishing sauce. Down east, the whole hog, split down the middle, is barbecued . The finishing sauce is a sharp, tomato-free vinegar-and-pepper ketchup. West of U.S. Highway 1, only the shoulders are barbecued, and the milder finishing sauce contains a touch of tomato. Which is better? That most likely depends on which joint you happen to be in at the moment!

BBQ Smoked Turkey : a Thanksgiving treat


Tired of the same old oven roasted turkey? Unfortunately, it is not the best way of preparing it. Back in the old days , turkeys were roasted over a real fire ,giving it a smoky flavor that really kicked it up notched. With a little work , you can give your turkey this same flavor by preparing it on the smoker. A smoked turkey is juicer and has a better flavor than an oven roasted turkey. The secret is cooking it low and slow with smoke. It will be more tender and juicy than you thought . To start you off , you will need is a turkey, a good thermometer, a smoker , hickory or apple wood chips and time.
Even a small turkey, say 12-14 pounds can take 6 to 8 hours. But don't let this scare you away, because it well worth the time!
I use a water smoker for my BBQ Turkey Breast recipe:


I have been smoking turkeys for years. I have always gotten great feed back.In fact you can purchase my Award winning apple smoked turkey at 591 1200 for details


Turkey Brine:
INGREDIENTS:
1 cup kosher salt
1 cup brown sugar
2 quarts apple juice (or cider)
1 or 2 quarts water ( enough to cover the breast
Mix the brine well. Soak the turkey for 16 hours in a non metal container covered in the fridge. I use a 5 gallon bucket . I put the bird in the brine frozen and allow it to thaw in the brine.
Smoked Turkey
I smoke on a Weber Smokey Mountain. So I start the smoker with about 12 lbs of charcoal. I normally put about 15 in a charcoal chimney and lite it . Once they are white, I will put them on top of the unlit charcoal.For a grill follow the indirect method on the kingsford charcoal bag. Also throw on a pie pan with water in it and set in middle of the charcoal rack between the coals

Take the bird out of the brine and rinse off with water. Pat dry with paper towel and place on the top cooking rack. I like to the rub it with olive oil and then rub it with garlic salt.Toss on a handful of apple wood chunks on the coals . Then put the top on the grill. When I use the WSM ( Weber Smokey Mountain) I have no need to add charcoal , but for a grill add charcoal as needed. You may need to adjust the bottom air intake vents from time to time to raise or lower the temps. But I always leave the exhaust vent all the way open to avoid to much smoke building up in the grill. I'll add more wood as needed to try and keep a nice light flow of smoke coming out. Turn the bird 180 degrees about an hour and a half into the cook to assure even cooking.

An 8 pound breast usually gets done between 2.5 to 3 hours with temps between 230F & 280F. On average it takes me just about 21 minutes a pound. This has been pretty well with every turkey breast I've ever smoked. A whole turkey could vary a bit. Pull off of grill when done, which is around 180F. Wait at least 10 minutes before carving.

You will never want to oven roast a turkey again!

Turkey can also be wrapped tightly and refrigerated; return to room temperature before serving.


If you don't have a smoker you can use a charcoal grill.Putting a turkey on a grill can be tricky . There are a couple of things you need to be prepared for. Prepare the grill for indirect cooking. You will be grilling indirectly, but because of the heat differences from one side of the turkey to another you will also need to circulate around the bird while cooking to keep things even. You will also need to maintain a steady temperature in the 230 degrees F. to 280 degrees F. range. If you follow some easy steps you should have a perfect turkey in 2 to 3 hours.

A turkey is a very versatile food, so break the traditions and try something a little different the next time you plan on preparing this bird. Here is a great recipe.


This comes out a gorgeous mahogany color in a smoker, so it looks great on a buffet table. Brining makes the meat turn out moist and firm-textured.


Corn Bread Dressing
The BBQ Connection
Call them at 434-286 3575.

Ingredients:

6 cups crumbled day-old corn bread (from 8-inch pan)
2 1/4 cups chicken broth
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cup (1 stick) salted butter
1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped, plus additional for garnish
4 celery stalks, chopped
1 large yellow onion, chopped
1 tablespoon of poultry seasoning
3 eggs, beaten


Directions:
Heat oven to 250° F. Spread the bread cubes on a baking sheet. Bake for 45
minutes; let cool.

In a large bowl, combine the corn bread, and enough broth (at least 2 cups) to
make a fairly mushy mixture.
Season with the salt and pepper.
Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.
Add the parsley, celery, and onion.
Cook until softened, about 10 minutes.
Add the onion mixture to the bread mixture; let cool.
Add the eggs and gently combine.

Spread the dressing in an unbuttered 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Bake until golden brown and warmed through, about 1 hour. If you want a crispy topping, leave uncovered; otherwise cover with foil halfway through cooking.

Sprinkle with additional parsley before serving, if desired.

Yield: Makes 8 servings, plus leftovers


Cranberry Relish Recipe
The BBQ Connection
Call them at 434-589-5375.

This is a great simple cranberry relish for all turkey dishes and turkey
sandwiches, and a tasty alternative to a more traditional cranberry sauce.

Preparation time: 15 minutes.

Ingredients:

2 cups washed raw cranberries
2 skinned and cored apples
1 l10 oz cn of mandrin oranges drained
1 cups sugar
1 tablespoon of your favorite whiskey

Directions:


Run fruit through a food processor.
Add sugar.
Let sit at room temperature until sugar dissolves.


Apple Crisp
The BBQ Connection
Call them at 434-589-5375.

Ingredients:
APPLE CRISP


1 can sliced apples, do not drain
1/3 c. Turbinado sugar

Spread apples,and sugar in bottom of 8 x 8 inch pan.

TOPPING:

3/4 c. Bisquick
1/2 c. sugar
1 stick butter (or butter)

Using pastry blender mix Bisquick, sugar, and butter until resembles cornmeal. Cook at 425 degrees until it starts to brown, then reduce heat to 350 degrees for approximately 25 minutes until nicely browned.



Grand Ma's Atkins Cornbread Dressing Recipe
The BBQ Connection

Ingredients


6 cups crumbled day-old corn bread (from 8-inch pan)
2 1/4 cups chicken broth
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cup (1 stick) salted butter
1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped, plus additional for garnish
4 celery stalks, chopped
1 large yellow onion, chopped
1 tablespoon of poultry seasoning
3 eggs, beaten



Directions
Heat oven to 250° F. Spread the bread cubes on a baking sheet. Bake for 45 minutes; let cool.
In a large bowl, combine the corn bread, and enough broth (at least 2 cups) to make a fairly mushy mixture.
Season with the salt and pepper.
Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.
Add the parsley, celery, and onion.
Cook until softened, about 10 minutes.
Add the onion mixture to the bread mixture; let cool.
Add the eggs and oysters with juice and gently combine.
Spread the dressing in an unbuttered 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Bake until golden brown and warmed through, about 1 hour. If you want a crispy topping, leave uncovered; otherwise cover with foil halfway through cooking.
Sprinkle with additional parsley before serving, if desired.

Yield: Makes 8 servings, plus leftovers

Rosell’s (GRAN) Sweet Potato Casserole

INGREDIENTS:
1 (29 ounce) can sweet
potatoes, drained
1/2 cup of walnuts (crushed)
1/2 cup of Coconut
1/2 stick of margerine
2 eggs
1/2 cup of milk
1 pinch of salt
1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
Topping :
1 (8 ounce) can crushed
pineapple, drained
1/4 cup of bisquick
1/2 cup sugar
1 egg
1 stick of margerine


DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
2. In a large bowl, mash the sweet potatoes until smooth. Add the pineapple, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves; mix well.
3. Pour into one 9x13 inch baking dish and top with the mixed topping ingredients. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown .

Peach Bread Pudding











Very easy and quick. I will be making this one for the GMC Crew Thanksgiving day!


Peach Bread Pudding
4 c. stale white bread
1/2 c. brown sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1 tsp.Apple pie spice
2 egg whites
6 c. peach halves (save juice)
2 eggs
2 tbsp. butter

Topping:
1 c bisquick
1 c turbinado sugar
1/2 cup of salted butter (soften)

Cut bread into bite-size cubes. Combine peach juice and bread. Add beaten egg with the sugar, salt,apple pie spice. Pour into a greased deep baking dish. Mix topping ingredients and place over bread mixture.Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes or until center is set.

Chesapeake Jubilee 2009

We went to Chesapeake with high expectations after two grand championships aqnd one top ten . We finished 17 out of 39 teams. I was very proud of my team. They cover for me . I had to leave in the last 3 hours . Congrats to David Hanso for walking. on his anything butt.
I felt like a winner. It was great to see Guts and family.





Sometime you win and sometimes you lose!

I think we were all winners !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Qing for the Cure part 2

A.J.Peregoy Fund raiser.
Once again friends from all over the state came to help raise money for A.J. Preregoy family. A.J. has Bone cancer. It was Great to see the Angels from the Boomer class of Antioch Baptist church. Gloria Newton and gang was awesome! Mark Harris and the BBQ Gang did a great job too! We cooked over 50 boston butts and 600 pieces of chicken.Also the Fluvanna Youth Baseball hit a home run with bringing over 500 people to the plate. It was great working with Susan and Buck Deforge. We were able to raise over $11,000 for A.J. s family.
Thanks to all.










The BBQ Snob's Charlottesville Area BBQ Review


I am a true confessed BBQ snob! I competed in the BBQ circuit for over 7 years. I have won nationally and state wide. I am a certified BBQ Judge. I am a member of MABA and the KCBS. I written BBQ articles locally and nationally. I have been featured on Good Morning Charlottesville and interviewed by the Discovering Channel . I have been invited by the Jack Daniels World Championship BBQ contest. I cooked for over 32 tears and run my own catering business for over 7 years.
I have given BBQ lectures and cooking classes with over 100 people in attendance.I have been seek for advice by many local BBQ contest organizers. My opinions are my own. I do not wish any ill harm to any of our local BBQ joints. My criteria is simple, if you want to make real barbecue please have the respect to take the time to at least use wood!Also keep it fresh!



Belmont BBQ - Charlottesville, VA 22902 One of the best BBQ joints in C'ville. Sometime the BBQ can be dry! Just tell them to stir the pot. Some people like the slop bucket . Yuck ! Wes uses a gas assisted smoker with real hickory!



Spry's Barbeque - Charlottesville, VA 22903 -
Great Vinegar base BBQ. The vinegar sauce will come out of your nose!
George uses a gas assisted smoker withe real hickory!


Big Jim's Barbecue 2104 Angus Rd., Charlottesville, VA, 22901
A C'ville legend. Too bad. If the new owner followed the same recipe of the old owner it is not made on site. I think they ship it in from NYC. If you want a cheap deal this place is it. If you are looking for real BBQ go somewhere else. Hey Mcdonalds has made trillions why not Big Jims!

Jinx's Pit' Stop Barbeque, Charlottesville, VA
What a character! Known better for his "high Jinxs" than his BBQ. Ask for slaw on his BBQ . He uses a home made cooker and does use real wood. He cooks pork to about 180 degree's and your will notice little globs of fat in your sandwich (they call that profit) Also I would too be very proud to have a bunch of Yankees to declare my Q the best lol. Reference to a bunch of NYC Magazines. Very quirky place. Full of character.

Hog Heaven BBQ & Catering Ruckersville, VA
They have a home made cooker. Looks very well built. They use wood. The last time I tasted their BBQ it was dry. I think given the right time it could be rather tasty. I was not impressed with the sauces.

Pee Wee's Pit
on Valley Street, Scottsville,VA.
Well what can I say! Pork cooked in a crock pot yum yum yum!!! (a propriety secrete my foot lol)

Smoken Eddie's BBQ & More 14971 Spotswood Trl, Ruckersville VA
I think they have a wood cooker. The last time we stopped there my 11 y/o son chewed my out because it was way too dry and bad . I met the owner and she seem nice. I am sure you could hit this place on a good day.

Buck Island Country Store ( Bayou) 2243 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy, Charlottesville, VA 22902
Sauce sauce sauce and $15 a pound for BBQ . I feel sorry for the pig .I never see smoke out of that cooker in front of the store.Where is the smoke taste?

ZydeCo. 12 Elliewood Ave., Charlottesville, VA
How Charlottesville yuppie do BBQ ,they don't get dirty. Use electricity! Not BBQ . Also very expensive!

Blue Ridge Pig
2198 Rockfish Valley Hwy. Nellysford, VA 22958.
The essence of what BBQ is. Strawberry looks and acts the part. he uses a real smoke house with wood.
Enough said. Go and try these place for your self.If you don't agree let me know . Also if you think your favorite BBQ joint is good enough to win a BBQ contest . We would love to you in Louisa VA in July.http://pigsontherun.com/queandcruz2008.aspx
 member since 2005

member since 2005