BBQ Connection LLC

Championship BBQ Catering at it's BEST!

Charlottesville, VA.

Only ChampionshipBBQ Catering Company!!!!!!
We are a Championship BBQ Catering Company (period!). BBQ Connection LLC  the BestChampionship onsite BBQ Catering Company in the area. Our Pit Master has spent the last 10 Ten years competing for throughout the country and perfecting his art.  The Pigs on the Run BBQCompetition team have won over a 100 top ten trophies in the country and recently finished in the Top 50 in the country in BBQ! We live and breathe BBQ!

Our pit masters do not just cook the area's best BBQ; they create a BBQ experience! From the smells in the air to the many trophies won.  The BBQ ConnectionCatering Company brings more to the table than just great food.  We cook fresh on site Traditional Barbecue, not that "stuff" that has been reheated or prepared off site days before your event.

Over 100 years of traditional artisan outdoor cooking, passed down from generation to generation in the backwoods of Va.

We also cater in Northern Virginia, Richmond, Staunton, Harrisonburg, Waynesboro VA. and all over the country! A travel fee will be assessed outside Charlottesville area.

 A proven winner: 4 x Grand Championships, 5 x state championships, Invited to the American Royal and the Jack Daniels twice. Over 100 top ten awards

We'll respond with a free, no-obligation job estimate and ideas that come from years (and thousands of miles) of experience!
 If you desire a truly memorable meal to which nothing else will compare, please give   Teresa call at 434 842 2000.

Charlotteville's BEST Championship BBQ!

BBQ Snob review: Country Boys BBQ

Country Boys BBQ

CB's is located close to where I grew up , so I had to stop by and see what's cooking. I had a great time talking to the owner and pit-master of Country Boy's BBQ. The food was good. I love the fries and slaw. The ribs are baby backs and very meaty. The pork was good. They only have one sauce so get over it! LOL says the owner. It is more like Piedmont Style , a little vinegary and with a tomato based to it. I liked it. Everything was cooked on a humongous Lang double  smoker enough to cook for over 2000 people a day. I don't think there is 2000 people  who live in Windsor Va. LOL . It was a good experience! I love the atmosphere! We wish them best of luck!

 the BBQ Snob!https://www.facebook.com/pages/Country-Boys-BBQ/447174398674882

Mooooooooooooink Balls

Mooooooooooooink Balls

 

Ingredients

12 Italian style meatballs, precooked

6 strip(s) bacon, cut in half

1 tablespoon(s) brown sugar

1/8 teaspoon(s) cayenne pepper
1/2 cup(s) barbecue sauce
1/2 cup(s) grape jelly

Equipment

Smoker
Toothpicks
Tongs


Directions

Wrap each meatball with a half strip of bacon and secure it with a toothpick.
Combine the brown sugar and cayenne pepper and sprinkle over the bacon-wrapped meatballs.
Smoke over indirect heat at 250 degrees for about 1 hour until the bacon is done to your liking.
While the Mooooooooink Balls are cooking, combine the barbecue sauce and grape jelly in a saucepan and heat until blended.
Five minutes before removing the balls from the smoker, baste them with the glaze. Serve immediately.

Tips & Techniques

Special note: This recipe also works great on the grill over direct heat for 10 to 15 minutes, although this method does require close attention. Bacon grease is highly flammable, so you will need to rotate the Moink Balls constantly to prevent scorching.

http://bbqconnectionllc.com/

Championship Brisket

Competition BRISKET



 Whole brisket, 15-16lbs. untrimmed (and still in cryovac)
Use fresh, not frozen
Brand “Creek Stone Farms” in Kansas City
Creek Stone Farms created a facility to sell their meat to Japan
types of meat they have
Prime or Choice
upper Choice is called “Master Chef”
lower Choice is called “Chef Table”
Brisket is aged for 14 days from creek stone farm


Age his brisket for up to 50 days past the kill date (by wet aging it in the cryovac it comes in) at a temperature between 30-39 degrees (in bottom of the fridge)
When dime sized air bubbles form in the cryovac, it is aged about 30 days
When nickel sized air bubbles form in the cryovac, it is aged about 35 days
When quarter sized air bubbles form in the cryovac, it is aged about 45 days
The smell of an aged brisket is a musky  cheddar smell (sour sharp smell means  and you want to puke , it has gone bad)
Aging tenderizes the beef and concentrates the beef flavor
I do not believe in dry aging
If you break the cryovac do not age it

 Look for a whole brisket that has a thick, flat triangular shape to it.
Thickness of flat in middle is the real key.  The thicker the better.

If mixed per instruction it thickens as it sits (this is not good)

Trimming the whole brisket:
Trims the whole brisket on Thursday night since you are allowed to trim your meats prior to a competition.
Trims out the large pocket of fat and the glob between the point and the flat

Then takes a big 6-7 “ slice from the corner of the flat parallel to the grain so that he knows how the grain runs
After trimming, the point is almost separated from the flat   Do this because after it is cooked he then just slides his huge brisket knife under the point and runs it horizontally so that he can easily separate the point from the flat.
Completely trims the point, and plans to use it for burnt end chunks.  When this comes out good it really comes out good
Do not trim any of the fat off the flat
The discoloration on the side of the brisket is where the meat hits the bone. It is not a problem and does not trim it off.

Injection of FAB B Lite:
Injects with the grain. 
Do not pull the needle out as he injects (like Chris Lilly preaches)
Inject mostly in the flat and only a little in the point
Timing:
Inject four hours before he puts the meat on the fire (about ten ounces of injection for one whole brisket).

Starts cooking the brisket right from the fridge (Do not let his brisket first come to room temp).
Wraps brisket in double foil at 7:00 A.M. to finish the cooking
Rub:
Sprinkle on Williams Fajita Rub on both sides (only a little, like salting a steak)
Heavily seasons both sides with Smokin’ Guns Hot Rub (putting more seasoning on the fat side) (about 1-1 ¼ cups per brisket)
Let it sit uncovered for 4 hours in an Cambro with an ice tray in the top of it

Cooking Process:
At 7:00 A.M. the brisket temps were 178 and 195.
At 7:00 A.M. he wrapped the briskets.  Poured ½ cup of the Beer Mop (recipe from Smoke & Spice cookbook) on each brisket (fat side up).  He then wrapped them in double foil, fat side up, tightly so they don’t steam.  Seal them tightly or you will have an issue
At 10:40 A.M. the brisket temps were 202 degrees, so he pulled them off the pit.
Pull brisket off the pit  Open the foil until it stops steaming and when you can only feel a low level of residual heat when holding your hand slightly above the brisket.   Then re-wraps the brisket.  He claims that this method alleviates moisture loss in the brisket when it gets sliced!
At around 11:00 A.M. … In a small loaf pan,  then covered the bottom with a little apple juice and then poured regular Blues Hog on top to come up to about 2/3rds of the way up the sides.  Put this in the smoker and let it heat up for an hour.  Puts in the apple juice to simply thin out the Blues Hog.  Use this sauce to finish off his ribs and his brisket
Cutting and Presentation
Brisket rested for 3 ½ hours in cambro.
Place it carefully on the cutting board flat side down, point side up.  He pulled slightly on the point and ran his knife parallel to the cutting board from the point to the end of the flat to separate the two pieces.  This allows him to clearly see the grain on the flat for slicing purposes.

Trimmed up the flat.
Sauced the top of the flat with the straight Blues Hog and apple juice.
 Sliced the flat at this point.
then flipped the sliced brisket over so the outside was now on the top.  He sauced the top.
 trimmed the whole edge of the flat so it was uniform and would fit in the box nicely.
 Make thick slices of the point so that they could be pulled into cubes for the box.  He did not cook the point anymore for the chunks.
Hold the sliced flat together until the very end.
Stacked the point chunks horizontally from left to right along the back of the box.
Take each flat slice and dusted each with powdered Smokin Guns Hot Rub.
Put shingled the slices horizontally from top to bottom under the point chunks, and put as many in as would fit in the box.    
Taste Test



Smoked Pecan Pie

COCONUT PECAN PIE

2 tbsp. butter
1 c. light brown sugar
3/4 c. light corn syrup
3 eggs, well beaten
1 tsp. vanilla
1/4 tsp. salt
1 c. coconut
1 c. pecans, broken
1 pie shell
Cream butter; add sugar and syrup. Add eggs, vanilla, and salt. Blend well. Add coconut and pecans; pour into pie shell. Bake at 250 degrees for 1 hour and 30 minutes.


This Recipe is perfect for the low and slow. I think a hickory smoke is a great accent to the pecan flavor. Fire up your smoker. Ensure clear smoke! I would recommend hickory wood. You may cover with foil pan to decrease smoke flavor. Make sure smoker is level.

Competition Basic BBQ CLASS 2013







Very thorough, very detailed, passionate expression of love for barbeque. Hold nothing back. !

Basic BBQ competition Class



Championship BBQ Competition Class

Get the BEST Bang with your Buck!

by Award-Winning BBQ Grand Champion John Atkins

John has competed all over our great country for over 10 years .

Pigs on the Run BBQ team has walked in over 75% of contest competed.

As a part time recreational team Pigs on the Run has been very competitive.

They have been invited to :



The American Royal three time .

The Jack Daniels invitational Draw x Three.

The Sam’s Club National BBQ Championship Series .



Avoid the the high paying BBQ Classes and

learn how to BBQ like a real Champion



April 6th 2013

Times and Dates: 11 am to 6 pm (approximately)

Location: TBD : Palmyra Va



Class Description: This class is geared towards applying competition BBQ techniques to your bbq cooking including food safety, meat selection, trimming, rubs, injections, mops, sprays, sauces, meat placement, temperature, chemistry of BBQ, foiling, meat doneness, bark development, smokers, grills, ovens, wood, and fire control.

In this seven -hour class, you will work side-by-side with John to smoke and prepare the 4 KCBS types of meats. Sauces and rubs are all prepared from regular pantry ingredients.



We will cover the basic four KCBS meats and have student make boxes and have experienced bbq judges judge the boxes. Discussion will take place with judges after class .











Discussion / Demonstration / Hands-On

How to light a fire

How to make your own rubs and sauces

How to prepare chicken, ribs, pork, and brisket,

How to prepare injections and marinades

Detailed instructions on cooking methods

Equipment and Accessories

Overview of BBQ contests and judging

Cooking Brisket

Cooking spareribs, St. Louis Ribs,

Discuss presentation tips

Cooking Chicken

Cooking and Pork Butt

Answering your grilling and BBQ problems and questions





Certificates and Conclusion





Class fees : $200 per person

spouse price: $75 with accompanying paying spouse ( $200)







Call Teresa At 434 286 3575 to enroll in class



For an application, complete request form below.











Basic BBQ CLASS



November 10th 2012









Great Christmas present!



Basic BBQ CLASS





Very thorough, very detailed, passionate expression of love for barbeque. Hold nothing back. !

Basic BBQ competition Class



Basic BBQ Class

Get the BEST Bang with your Buck!

by Award-Winning BBQ Grand Champion John Atkins

John has competed all over our great country.

Pigs on the Run BBQ team has walked in over 75% of contest competed.

As a part time recreational team Pigs on the Run has been very competitive.

They have been invited to :



The American Royal three time !

The Jack Daniels invitational Draw x Three.!

The Sam’s Club National BBQ Championship Series !



Avoid the the high paying BBQ Classes and

learn how to BBQ like a real Champion

Location: TBD , Palmyra Va

Times and Dates: 1 pm to 5 pm (approximately)

Class Description: This class is geared towards applying basic BBQ techniques to your bbq cooking including food safety, meat selection, trimming, rubs, injections, mops, sprays, sauces, meat placement, temperature, chemistry of BBQ, foiling, meat doneness, bark development, smokers, grills, ovens, wood, and fire control. Focus is on Chicken and Ribs

In this four hour class, you will work side-by-side with John to smoke and prepare chicken and ribs. Sauces and rubs are all prepared from regular pantry ingredients.





Discussion / Demonstration / Hands-On

How to light a fire

How to make your own rubs and sauces

How to prepare chicken,and ribs.

How to prepare injections and marinades

Detailed instructions on cooking methods

Equipment and Accessories

Overview of BBQ contests and judging

Cooking spareribs, St. Louis Ribs,

Discuss presentation tips

Cooking Chicken

Answering your grilling and BBQ problems and questions

Certificates and Conclusion





A Chip of the old Block

My 15-year-old son, Bryant Atkins, competed in the backyard barbeque category with his team “Heavenly Smokers”. It was his first time competing without his me, “His 75-year-old grandfather came all the way from Lynchburg to help him,” Atkins said. “He helped me at my first one. It goes far deeper than barbeque. It’s about relationships.”
 Bryant finished first in ribs. He killed them , and he came in 3rd in chicken. His granfather was so excited that he made Bryant take his chicken out 17 minutes before time and was .5 off from grand champion!
Great Job Son!

BBQ, bands and beer lure 7,000

About 7,000 people streamed onto the grounds at Pleasant Grove Saturday (June 23) for Fluvanna’s First BBQ, Bands and Brews festival, sponsored by the Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce.




After days of humid weather with temperatures in the high 90s, a “cold” front came through bringing with it thunder, lightning and lots of rain the day before. Left in its wake was less humid weather but plenty of sunshine and temperatures in the high 80s. Enough to sweat by with a touch of a breeze to cool off.



BBQ, Bands and Brews was the brainchild of John Atkins, pit boss of BBQ Connection. As he sat outside the judge’s tent, Atkins talked about all the hard work it took to bring his idea to fruition.



“I may be the show piece; the eye candy – but they (Brenda Rigsby and Scott Valentine) are the backbone of the event,” Atkins said. “They had to listen to me for nine months incessantly.”



Rigsby stood by and nodded her head.



“And we’re looking forward to not listening to him at all for at least one month,” she said.



Atkins said this was the first such festival in the area and the biggest inaugural event in the county.The Chamber of Commerce, which sponsored the event, was giving 10 percent of the proceeds to the Fluvanna County Food Bank, Atkins said.



People stood in line to buy barbeque, while Kansas City Barbeque Society sanctioned judges sat in a white tent away from the crowds tasting chicken, pork ribs, pork and beef brisket prepared by competing teams.







Atkins’ 15-year-old son, Bryant Atkins, competed in the backyard barbeque category with his team “Heavenly Smokers”. It was his first time competing without his father, Atkins said.



“His 75-year-old grandfather came all the way from Lynchburg to help him,” Atkins said. “He helped me at my first one. It goes far deeper than barbeque. It’s about relationships.”



Bryant Atkins was named Reserve Grand Champion and won first place in the pork ribs category.



U.S. Congressman Robert Hurt (R) was working the crowd. He stopped by the judges’ tent and congratulated Atkins on the event.



“This is amazing,” Hurt said. “It’s so nice to see so many happy people. It’s great. I’m a fan of the Chamber of Commerce and the economic development it promotes.”



Hurt’s Democratic opponent John Douglass also put in an appearance.



While people walked around stopping at vendors’ booths, they were entertained by live music courtesy of Cedar Creek. Later in the day, The Rhondels took the stage.



Alicia and Andy Peterson of Lake Monticello sat on the grass eating barbecue and watching their children Savannah, 4, Connor, 2, and Grayson, 1, dance to the music.



“It’s family, food and fun,” Alicia Peterson said. “We love getting out to do stuff every weekend and this seemed like a good way to spend the day.”



A total of 43 vendors sold food or promoted their products to the crowd.



Nearby sat Anne and Jeff Gomala, sipping on beer from the many microbreweries set up at the festival.



“This is an awesome thing for the county to do,” Anne Gomala said.



Amber Vandevander and 15 of her family and friends all sat lined up in chairs sipping drinks and listening to the music.



“We had some of the wood-grilled pizza and it was really good,” Vandevander said. “This is so nice. It’s family friendly. And this band is really good. Some of the songs they played sounded just like the original artists.”



The Fluvanna High School class of 2002 decided to hold its 10th reunion at the festival.



John Sheridan, who had been the class president, said when he heard about the event, he thought it would be a good place to get together with his classmates.



“It’s the perfect opportunity: food, music and support the county,” Sheridan said. “We’ve really enjoyed it and we couldn’t have asked for better weather.”



Sheridan now lives in Cheyenne, Wy. and said others from as far away as Miami and Denver came back for the reunion.



That’s exactly the kind of thing Scott Valentine, one of the members of the team putting on the event, had in mind.



Valentine said he is from a small farming town in upstate New York. His town held the county fair every year and it is like a homecoming for people who moved away.



“People go back every year and have their reunions,” Valentine said. “Everyone knows you go home that week.”



Valentine said he hopes BBQ, Bands and Brews becomes an annual event that brings people to Fluvanna in the same way.



Those who didn’t get to the festival can catch it online at BBQTV. Atkins met Mark Farris, owner of BBQTV at the Sam’s Club Nationals in Bentonville, Ark, in June. Atkins told Farris about the Fluvanna event and he decided to add it to his East Coast trip. Farris documents barbecue competitions throughout the United States and shows them on his YouTube channel.



Official are still busy tallying how much money was made at the event.



To garnish or not to garnish, that is the question

Yaw Boachie and John Atkins from The BBQ Connection provided lunch.Smoke wafted through the air on Conestoga Way.
There was barbequing going on.
Barbeque enthusiasts crowded into Crossroads Auto Repair Saturday (March 17) to learn how to become certified Kansas City Barbeque Society judges.
They hope to be chosen to judge Fluvanna’s first KCBS sanctioned barbeque competition June 23 at Pleasant Grove – BB, Bands and Brews - sponsored by the Fluvanna County Chamber of Commerce.
The wannabe judges came from all over: Virginia, Maryland – even Georgia –for the opportunity to eat smoked, grilled chicken, pork butt, ribs and beef brisket.
Don Hartwell, from North Carolina, taught the 37 students the finer points of judging. He covered things like:
  • Appearance, taste and tenderness;
  • Scoring on a two to nine-point scale (two stands for inedible);
  • Judges may not cut, slice or shake (the meat) to separate pieces;
  • Sauce is optional but it must be on the meat only, no cups or pooling in the container;
  • Chunks in the sauce must be no larger than an 1/8 inch cube;
  • Garnishing is allowed, but only fresh, green lettuce, flat or curly parsley and cilantro are legal garnishes – kale, red leaf lettuce, endive, cabbage and lettuce hearts are prohibited.
Hartwell acknowledged that the judging process has unwittingly weeded out sauces and styles peculiar to different parts of the country.
“We’re not telling you to change your tastes, your preferred flavors,” Hartwell said. “Judge based on your taste. Just be consistent. I tell people that if they cook eastern North Carolina barbeque, they’re probably not going to win because most people don’t like that style. Not a lot of people like mustard or mayonnaise based sauces. They’re looking for tomato-based sauces. It has taken the regional element out of cooking, but that’s just the way it is.”
While the students were inside learning, John Atkins, owner of The BBQ Connection, was outside barbequing. Just like in a regular competition, the students would receive a white Styrofoam box filled with each of the four cuts of falling off the bone, smoked and seasoned meat.
Timothy Williamson of Reston was one of those paying $90 to learn how to judge competitions. He wants to become certified to judge the annual Safeway BBQ competition in Northern Virginia.
“I was born and raised in the South – barbeque is my life,” Williamson said. “I smoke (meat) at home. I love the culture of it. Friends and family. Good times and good eats. I’m also an engineer so I enjoy the science of it. Taking a tough cut of meat – something most cooks wouldn’t bother with and turning it into something everyone wants to get their hands on.”
Closer to home were Bob McDermott, Roger Koltz, Dennis Kidd and Dan Nunziato, all from Fluvanna.
Nunziato took the class because he likes to eat and he’s curious, he said.
Ditto for McDermott.
“I’ve traveled the country and everywhere I’ve gone to I seek out barbeque,” he said. “I want to be more educated about what I’m eating.”
Kidd said he started cooking at 12 “on the dairy farm.” He wants to enter a few contests and is taking the judging class to get clued in on preferences and patterns.
“I want to see what they (judges) are looking for,” Kidd said.
Koltz is another competitive cook.
“I’m a competition chili cook,” he said. “I’ve done some barbeque contests in Kansas City, D.C. and Memphis. I want to get back into it. I’m originally from Texas so I know a lot about brisket.”
While going over the sanctioned garnishes, Hartwell waxed eloquent about the pros and cons of a new trend: parsley boxes.
A few years ago competitors started cutting up fresh parsley and covering the bottom of the box with the garnish, then layering the meats to be judged on top.
“It looks real pretty,” Hartwell said. “But when you pick up the meat it has all these little bits of parsley stuck to it that you have to peel off. It’s kind of a hassle.”
Brenda Rigsby, of the Chamber of Commerce, sat in the back of the room soaking it all in, excited about the upcoming event.
There will be 31 KCBS certified teams taking part in BBQ, Blues and Brews, including 15 from the area, she said.
Blue Mountain Brewery will bring in 20 craft brews. There will be seven food vendors and as many as 70 craft vendors, she said. Two bands, including the Rondelles from Virginia Beach will play from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Rigsby said she hopes it will bring people from far and wide into Fluvanna.
“The governor has recognized this as a state event,” Rigsby said. “He’s promoting it. He’s put his stamp of approval on it.”

Barbecue feast coming to Fluvanna

John Atkins brought the barbeque competiton to Fluvanna.Fluvanna foodies will feast on barbecue this summer thanks to local entrepreneur John Atkins.
Atkins himself has travelled the country and participated in Kansas City Barbecue Society (KCBS) competitions for the last ten years, and won over 100 trophies. Atkins, a Scottsville native, runs Pigs on the Run competition barbecue team and owns the catering company Barbecue Connection.
“It’s been a dream of mine to bring a Kansas City Barbecue Society national championship here,” said Atkins.
For years he’s been trying to get a KCBS competition in Fluvanna, but couldn’t find a large enough sponsor to agree to host it – until now. With the organizational help and backing of the Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce, the event will be called “BBQ, Bands & Brews” and will be held at Pleasant Grove on June 23.
“The Chamber wanted to do something at Pleasant Grove in the summer with live music and beer, of course that was contingent on the Board of Supervisors approving alcohol use on county property, which they did,” said Scott Valentine, of the Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. “We’re hoping to make this an annual event.”
Typically, Kansas City style barbecue is slow cooked over a variety of woods and then covered with a thick tomato and molasses based sauce. According to its website, KCBS is the world’s largest organization of barbecue and grilling enthusiasts, with over 14,000 members worldwide. The KCBS has gained more public attention since the success of the TLC show Pitmasters, which follows several KCBS teams around the country as they compete in events like that which will be hosted in Fluvanna this summer.
“At the actual event will be having approximately 30 national teams,” said Valentine. “They come in with their mobile homes and smokers. Some come in with big rigs, some have much more modest set ups.”
The Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce will need over 50 judges to assess the quality of barbecue for both the main KCBS competition and the local backyard competition, which will still be judged by KCBS standards.
“We’d like to attract some local people to be judges,” said Valentine. “We’ve talked to certified judges from Richmond and eastern shore of Maryland, but we also want to make this a community event. We’re also doing a backyard barbecue division where we hope to get around 15 local barbecuers. ”
In order to provide local judges that will assess barbecue on Kansas City Barbecue Society standards, the Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce will be holding a judges certification class on March 17.
“Kansas City Barbecue Society representatives will be coming up from North Carolina to run the class,” said Valentine. The class is free, four hours long and instructs judges on the criteria for judging.
“Our criteria for judging is appearance, tenderness and taste,” said Carolyn Wells, executive director of the Kansas City Barbecue Society. “The scoring system is from nine – excellent – to two – inedible.”
In addition to the barbecue portion of the event, the Chamber hopes to attract 70 local vendors and 5,000 attendees. Two stages will feature bands and 20 different micro brews from Blue Mountain Brewery to Belgium will be available for tasting. Thistlegate, Fluvanna’s only vineyard, will also be in attendance with wine for tasting.
For the $10 adult entrance fee, participants get a commemorative beer stein.
Ten percent of the proceeds will be donated to the Fluvanna County Food Bank. The other 90 percent will go back to the Chamber’s normal fund to cover expenses – scholarships, a full-time staff member, and promotion of Fluvanna businesses.
“We know that the economic impact of events we sanction is significant,” said Wells, of KCBS.
For more information visit http://www.fluvannachamber.org.

Pigs on the Run BBQ Competition Cooking Class

Competition Brisket
Competition BBQ CLASS

May 12th 2012


Very thorough, very detailed, passionate expression of love for barbeque.  Hold nothing back !
Basic BBQ competition Class

Championship BBQ Competition Class.
Get the BEST Bang with your Buck,
by Award-Winning BBQ Grand Champion John Atkins.

John has competed  all over our great country.
Pigs on the Run BBQ  team has walked in  over 75% of contest competed.
 As a part time recreational team, Pigs on the Run has been very competitive.

They have been invited to :

The American Royal three time !
The Jack Daniels invitational Draw x Three!
The Sam’s Club  National BBQ Championship Series !

They Finish top Five in pork at the American Royal out of about 500 teams
Over 100 to ten trophies.
4 Grand Championships
 Certified BBQ Judge
BBQ , Bands and Brews contest Organizer
Top 50th BBQ team in the country 2011 from Sam's Club National BBQ Series


Avoid the the high paying BBQ Classes and
learn how to BBQ like a  real Champion

Location: Pleasant Grove , Palmyra Va
Times and Dates: 11 am to 5 pm (approximately)
Class Description: This class is geared towards applying competition BBQ techniques to your bbq cooking including food safety, meat selection, trimming, rubs, injections, mops, sprays, sauces, meat placement, temperature, chemistry of BBQ, foiling, meat target temp, bark development, smokers, wood, and fire control.
In this six-hour class, you will work side-by-side with John to smoke and prepare the  4  KCBS types of meats. Sauces and rubs are all prepared from regular pantry ingredients.




Discussion / Demonstration /  Hands-On
How to light a fire
How to make your own rubs and sauces
How to prepare chicken, ribs, pork, and brisket,
How to prepare injections and marinades
Detailed instructions on cooking methods
Equipment and Accessories
Overview of BBQ contests and judging
Cooking Brisket
Cooking spareribs, St. Louis Ribs,
Discuss presentation tips
Cooking Chicken
Cooking and Pork Butt
Answering your grilling and BBQ problems and questions

Certificates and Conclusion

BBQ Bands and Brews BBQ Contest Palmyra Va 223 June 2012

I am very excited about this contest! This my first contest I get tio help put together. The Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce has asked me to help put this on!. It will be and grand event. We will have 30 national bbq teams competing for the the state championship.
 
 
The Fluvanna County Chamber of Commerce is proud to present its Inaugural BBQ, Bands & Brews, located at Pleasant Grove, Palmyra, VA on June 23, 2012 from 10:00 a.m until 6:00 p.m. This is an event for the entire family featuring a variety of activities including barbeque competitions, entertainment, and local vendors offering varied products and services.







BBQ, Bands & Brews will include a newly sanctioned Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS) event in Virginia and as such will draw contestants from across the Commonwealth and beyond in the categories of pork, ribs, chicken and brisket. The Grand Champion of the 2012 BBQ, Bands & Brews will be invited to the largest barbeque contest in the world - the American Royal Invitational (Kansas City, MO) - and entered into the lottery for the Jack Daniels World Championship Invitational (Lynchburg, TN). All top finishers in the BBQ competition will receive invitations to compete in other sanctioned contests. As an official State Barbeque Championship of Virginia, this event offers local residents and visitors to central Virginia a unique opportunity to experience all the fun of this family-event in the beautiful setting of Pleasant Grove in Fluvanna County.











Smoke Standing rib roast for Christmas!

What Is Prime Rib?



A succulent, tender and flavorful Prime Rib Roast will make your dinner guests feel extra special. There's nothing better than a slow-roasted Prime Rib that is beautifully marbled, hand-trimmed and perfectly aged. Particularly if the Prime Rib Roast is certified USDA Prime.




Choosing The Right Prime Rib.

Most people think that the word "Prime" in Prime Rib means it is USDA Prime Grade. But unless the USDA preceeds the designation, it is not certified USDA Prime. The word "Prime" by itself only describes the most desirable part of the "rib section" of the beef regardless of the USDA (US Department of Agriculture) Grade.

The top grades of beef are USDA Prime, USDA Choice and USDA Select with Prime being the most superior. Click here to see how the USDA grades beef.

There is only a limited supply of USDA Prime Beef on the market and it is generally reserved for the finest upscale restaurants or sold directly to consumers via express shipping. Generally you will not find USDA Prime cuts of beef in typical supermarkets.

If you really want to impress your quests with mouth-watering Prime Rib, visit the Stock Yards of Chicago and consider purchasing the best USDA Prime, Prime Rib Roast available. Just as you'll find in the finest restaurants in America, Stock Yards USDA Prime Rib is beautifully marbled, hand-trimmed and perfectly aged.

Stock Yards USDA Prime Rib is extremely tender and is presented with the very best center-cut five rib bones that has the richest, beefy flavor. Once you taste the Stock Yards delicious and juicy rib roast, you will fully understand there is a difference between just Prime Rib and USDA Prime, Prime Rib.


The whole prime rib includes ribs 6 through 12, and can be divided into smaller sections depending on the needs of the customer. A prime rib has a "small" end and a "large" end. The large end, nearest the shoulder, is less fatty and a bit less tender than the small end but has good flavor.


Preparing a Prime Rib Roast For the Smoker


A prime rib can be seasoned with a complex mix of spices, or with only salt and pepper as this one was. I used kosher salt, and opted to use white pepper instead of black, only for the reason that it wouldn't be visible on the finished roast. Be generous with seasonings on a prime rib. When served, it's only the seasoned outer edge of the slice that flavors the entire piece.


To get more flavor into the meat, the ribs can be partially cut away from the roast, which allows the meat to be seasoned under the rib bones. After seasoning, the bones need to be tied back snugly against the meat with butcher's twine. The bones add great flavor to the prime rib, and prevent it from drying as it cooks.


After the prime rib roast is seasoned, cover it loosely with foil or plastic wrap and let it sit at room temperature to warm up for about an hour. By doing this, the meat will cook much more evenly that it would if it went into the smoker cold. Now is a good time to start up the smoker.


Smoking Prime Rib- Set Up the Smoker

Choose An Appropriate Smoke Wood


Given the cost of this meat, the last thing you want to do is ruin it by using a smoke wood that's too strong or by applying too much smoke. I recommend that you use a mild fruit wood, and that you use it sparingly.

 Chose modest-sized chunks of apple and cherry, two each, which I did not soak in water before use. The dry wood provided a quick but effective burst of smoke during the relatively short cooking time of this roast.

Fire The Cooker

Fire-up the cooker using the Standard Method--one full chimney of hot Kingsford charcoal briquettes in the charcoal bowl, followed by another full chimney of unlit Kingsford, allowing all coals to become fully lit before cooking.

If you have two chimneys, you can fill and fire both simultaneously.

Foil The Water Pan

Cover the inside and outside of the water pan with wide, heavy duty aluminum foil. Place the pan inside the cooker, but leave it empty.

Smoke The Prime Rib

When all the coals are covered with gray ash, assemble the cooker and place the roast bone-side down on the top grate. Insert a probe thermometer in the center of the roast to monitor the internal meat temperature during cooking.



Set the three bottom vents to 100% open. Open the top vent fully and leave it that way throughout the entire cook. Add the smoke wood to the hot coals.



The cooker temperature will start out at 400-450°F, but should ramp down to 350-360°F after the addition of the meat. If it's a cool, breezy day, you may need to keep the bottom vents wide open to achieve 350°F measured at the lid. If it's a calm, warm day, you may need to partially close the bottom vents to bring the cooker down to about 350°F.

Cook at 350°F to 5-10° below the final internal temperature you want to achieve. Residual heat in the meat will cause the internal temp to rise 5-10°F during a 30 minute rest after cooking.

I like my prime rib somewhere between medium-rare and medium--pink, but not bloody--so I picked 125°F as the internal temperature at which I would remove the roast from the cooker. After a 30 minute rest, I would expect it to reach a final internal temperature of 130-135°F. Going much beyond 135°F risks overcooking the roast, so be careful if you do.

If you want rare prime rib with some medium-rare and medium meat on the ends, remove the roast from the cooker at 115°F so it will reach a final temperature of 120-125°F after that 30 minute rest.

Estimated cooking time is 20-28 minutes per pound, depending on factors such as the size of the roast, how hot the cooker is running, what type of fuel is used, and weather conditions, but my experience has been 19-23 minutes per pound with roasts like this one.

There's no need to turn or baste the roast during the cooking process.

Rest The Meat

Place the roast on a rimmed baking pan, cover loosely with aluminum foil, and let rest 30 minutes before slicing. This allows the meat to finish cooking and for the juices to redistribute and stabilized within the roast.

Alternatively, you can hold the roast at serving temperature for up to an hour by wrapping it tightly with two layers of foil and placing it in an empty ice chest.

Carve And Serve


Smoking Prime Rib- When Is It Done?

Prime rib is done when the internal temperature tells you it's done. Use a remote thermometer so you don't have to open up the smoker to check the temp. Each time the smoker is opened, the cooking time is extended by 10 to 20 minutes.



Remove the rib bones* and cut the roast into half-inch thick slices. Serve with a salad, baked potatoes, and a variety of grilled veggies. Make sure there's crusty bread for soaking up the meat juices left in the bottom of the plate.

*Some would say that munching on the rib bones is the best part of smoking prime rib!

One last thing, as the smoking prime rib nears completion in the smoker, put together some horseradish sauce for dipping. It's easy to make. Simply combine 1/4 mayonnaise with 2 to 3 teaspoons of spicy horseradish and squeeze of lemon juice. Make the sauce at least 30 minutes beforehand so the flavors have time to meld together.

















BBQ Connection LLC Dressing

BBQ Connection LLC Dressing

2 pounds breakfast sausage
1-1/2 cups chopped onion
3 cups finely diced celery
1-1/2 cups margarine, melted
16 cups stale hamburger bun cubes
2 tablespoons poultry seasoning
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 tablespoon your favorite bbq rub
2 medium eggs
1/4 cup water

Directions
This recipe's Ingredients were scaled to yield a new amount. The directions below still refer to the original recipe yield of 8 cups.

Cook sausage. Drain.
Melt margarine. Add enough to sausage drippings to make 1 cup.
Saute; onions and celery in margarine/dripping mixture until onion is tender. DO NOT BROWN. Stir in about 1/3 bread cubes. Put in big bowl and add remaining bread cubes, poultry seasoning, eggs and pepper. Watch your hands, it's hot. Mix well.
Pour broth and butter over the top and toss to combine. Spoon mixture into a 9x13 inch baking dish; cover. Cook  at 250 degrees F for 90 minutes.

Enjoy!

BROCCOLI SALAD

BROCCOLI SALAD


1 c. celery
3 c. raw broccoli, chopped
1/2 cup of chopped walnuts
1/2 c. raisins
1/2 teaspoon of your favorite bbq rub!
Dressing:
1 c. Vinegerette
1/4 c. sugar
2 t. vinegar
Combine all the salad ingredients in a mixing bowl. Then make the dressing pour over the salad mixture and stir.*Best if you let set 1 hour after putting on the salad.

BBQ Pecan Pie

 BBQ Pecan Pie

  6 tablespoons butter, softened
  1 cup  sugar
  3 eggs, slightly beaten
  1 teaspoon vanilla
  3/4 cup Light Corn Syrup
  1 tablespoon Corn Starch 

   2 cups pecans
  1 (9-inch) baked or frozen deep-dish pie crust

 

1. Preheat cooker  to 350F.
2. Cream together butter and brown sugar in medium bowl. Add eggs, vanilla, Corn Syrup, Corn Starch . Blend well.
3. Place 1 cup pecans in bottom of pie crust. Pour pie mixture over the pecans, and then top with remaining 1 cup pecans.
4. Place on cooker,
5. Bake in the grill at 350F for 55 to 60 minutes or until center appears barely set. Cool to room temperature on wire rack.
_________________http://www.thesmokering.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2232

BBQ Turkey



To brine a whole turkey, you need to:
Brining is the process of soaking meat in a mixture of water, salt, sugar and seasonings for several hours to several days, depending on the type and size of meat. Brining adds flavor and moisture to turkey and works well with other types of meat, too.

Find a non-reactive container large enough to hold the turkey make sure the container will fit in your refrigerator determine how much brine you need to prepare to completely submerge the turkey in the container
 Keep in mind that the bigger the container you use, the more brine you'll have to make, so try to match the size of the container to the turkey.
To determine how much brine you'll need to prepare, place the turkey into the container and cover with cold water. Remove the turkey from the container and measure the water—that's the amount of brine you'll need.

http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/turkey3.html

Shake's Honey Brine

1 gallon water
1 cup pickling salt
2 Tablespoons Morton Tender Quick
1 cup honey 4 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon pickling spice
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves



Combine all ingredients except the honey in a large pot and heat to 160°F, stirring to dissolve the salt and extract flavor from the bay leaves and pickling spice. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the honey until combined. It is said that temperatures above 160°F harm the flavor of honey, so that's why the mixture is not heated above that temperature. Finally, force-cool the mixture to room temperature using an ice bath before adding to the meat.

You will need 2 gallons of brine.The  concentrated version of the brine by dissolving two recipes worth of ingredients in just 3 quarts of water , force-cooling the mixture to room temperature in an ice bath in the kitchen sink , then placing the turkey into a 2 1/2 gallon baggy  inside a medium-sized cooler and pouring in the 3 quarts of concentrated brine solution plus 5 more quarts of cold water to achieve 2 gallons of brine solution .

Allow the turkey to soak in the brine mixture in the refrigerator for 48 hours . Since brining does not preserve meat, the turkey must be kept below 40°F throughout the entire brining process. That's why you've got to make sure you've got room in your fridge for the container before you start this process.
Air Dry The Turkey


Remove the turkey from the brine solution and pat dry inside and out with paper towels. There is no need to rinse the turkey after brining.

Let turkey  to air-dry . Place on a platter or rimmed baking sheet and allow to air-dry for 24 hours in the refrigerator . This helps create crispy skin during cooking.

Let the turkey sit at room temperature for about 1 hour before cooking. Brush the skin with a few Tablespoons of melted butter and sprinkle with just a bit of kosher salt and ground black pepper for looks .

 Spatchcocking:
Now it's time to spatchcock the turkey. Most sources recommend spatchcocking a 12- to 14-pound turkey

After brining the turkey, rinse it off so the residual brine doesn't stay on the turkey and set it on your counter.  Find the backbone of the turkey and with very sharp kitchen scissors or poultry shears, start cutting along one side. Then cut along the other.
At this point, the backbone's almost removed. If you need help and the scissors aren't cutting it (ha!) try a chef's knife.
Save the backbone for flavoring stews, broths, or other soups. Freeze it to use later. After the backbone has been removed, spread out the turkey.
After spreading out the turkey, flip it so the breasts are facing the ceiling and break the breastbones. (
 Before placing the turkey in the cooker rub with garlic salt and olive oil


Barbecue The Turkey

Fire-up the Weber Bullet using the Minion Method—fill the charcoal chamber about 1/2 full with unlit Kingsford charcoal briquettes and then spread about 30 hot coals over the unlit ones.

Place a few small chunks of your favorite smoke wood on the hot coals. I used 2 chunks of apple and 2 chunks of hickory .

Assemble the cooker with the water pan in place and fill it with cool water.


Place the turkey breast-side up on the top cooking grate . Set the top vent to 100% open and leave it that way throughout the entire cooking process. Start with all 3 bottom vents 100% open. As the cooker approaches 250°F, begin to partially close all 3 bottom vents to maintain 225-275°F. Adjust the bottom vents as needed to maintain this temperature range throughout the cooking process.


Cook the turkey until it measures 160-165°F in the breast, 170-175°F in the thigh, approximately 3-1/2 to 4 hours. My turkey took 3-1/2 hours to reach 167°F in the breast.


There's no need to baste or rotate the turkey during the cooking process.
Here's how the cooker temperatures and vent settings went during my cook:

Time Lid Temp Vent 1 % Vent 2 % Vent 3 %

5:15pm -       100              100          100
5:45pm 217  100              100          100
6:00pm 235  100              100          100
6:15pm 245  100              100          100
6:30pm 250  100              100          100
6:45pm 250  100              100          100
7:15pm 255 100               100          50
7:45pm 262 100               100          0
8:45pm 275 100               100          0


Rest Then Carve The Turkey


Remove the turkey from the cooker and let rest for 20-30 minutes before carving . Do not cover with foil, as this will cause the skin to go soft.
Alternatively, wrap the turkey tightly in several layers of wide, heavy duty aluminum foil, place breast-side down in a dry cooler, and hold for 90 minutes before carving


Assuming you don't over smoke the turkey, the drippings will be perfect for making gravy—in fact, they're already seasoned by the salt applied to the turkey.

As you remove the turkey from the cooker, pour any accumulated juices inside the body cavity into the pan. You can also use the juices left in the bottom of a rimmed baking pan after letting the turkey rest before carving.


It's not uncommon to end up with about 1-1/2 cups of drippings .






White Smoke Bad!: Fire control !

Creosote BBQ :

Have you ever tasted BBQ that tasted like an ash trash? Well here is the reason why! 
      Have you ever seen Thin Blue Smoke - The highly desired color and amount of smoke coming out of the exhaust of a smoker. The thin blue smoke denotes a clean burn. A clean burn denotes great BBQ! No impurities!
Here is my explanation of what i am trying to convey: Wood does not burn directly. Rather, when heat is applied it first undergoes a process of thermal degradation called pyrolysis in which the wood breaks down into a mixture of volatiles and solid carbonaceous char. The cellulose and hemicellulose form mainly volatiles while the lignin mainly forms the char. Exactly what products are formed by each depends upon the temperature, heating rate, particle size, and any catalysts that might be present. The solid char remains in place. What goes up with the volatiles are a gas fraction (carbon monoxide and dioxide, some hydrocarbons, and elemental hydrogen), a condensed fraction (water, aldehydes, acids, ketones, and alcohols), and -- here we go! -- a tar fraction (sugar residues from the breakdown of cellulose, furan derivatives, phenolic compounds, and -- pay attention here -- airborne particles of tar and charred material which form the smoke. If oxygen is present and the temperature is sufficiently high, burning of the volatiles occurs. When temperatures are too low or when there is insufficient oxygen for complete combustion of the volatiles, smoldering occurs. This is characterized by smoking, the emission of unoxidized pyrolysis products. (This is the awful tasting stuff, creosote, that will give barbecue a bitter taste. (IE BBQ Exchange! ) If the temperature is high enough and sufficient oxygen is present, then flaming combustion occurs with less smoking and more complete oxidation of the pyrolysis products. Further pyrolysis of volatiles during flaming combustion may cause char particles (soot) to form. The remaining lignin char burns in the presence of oxygen in glowing combustion. These are my beloved coals that yield the thin blue smoke that makes great barbecue! And, that's why it is so important to preburn the wood to coals." 

Conclusion:Thin Blue Smoke good , White smoke Bad!

Sincerely the BBQ Snob!

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BBQ Snob review of King's BBQ in Petersburg Va


King's BBQ Has been around since 1946. The only good memories I have about Petersburg Va is King's. It has been over 30 years since I visit King's. I now know why , I start cooking BBQ the traditional way. As I enter the place at 2 pm it was somewhat busy. I found  a booth and sat down!. I could smell the sweet wisp of smoke traveling from the kitchen.
 Shortly after I sat down , a waitress right out of "Mels Dinner" called me hun! You gotta love that!
I order the large plate of "Q" chopped with fries , slaw and micro bisquits!
I also ordered  Sweet Tea! I drove the waitress  crazy because I went through about 10 glasses! I only waited about 10 minutes. In the background you can hear some one chopping pork. I saw my waitress come out of the kitchen  and went to the chopping place. The guy scooped up a large portion of pork and placed it on my plate! "from the cooker to chopping board to my plate!" Yum!
 The meal was a great trip down memory row. My Grandfather was a great influence in my life , especially in food.I remember him taking me here!
The food was awesome, sauce was good! I love the rolls and slaw. the apple pie was the bomb!It was great to come back! I will make sure it not 30 years before my next visit.
Take out menu below!
http://www.kingsfamousbarbecue.com/menu.htm!


member since 2005

member since 2005